Rainbow Trout

Our Most Read Articles of 2013

It's New Year's day, so we're phoning it in a bit by looking back on the most read articles from last year. Even though we keep pretty tight tabs on which articles are well received by our readers, when you look back at a period as long as a year, there are often some surprises. The five articles that follow were the most read of those we published in 2013.

Shrews Mice Trout Stomach
Probably not typical, but this is still why you sling mice for trout.

#5) This is Why You Sling Mice for Trout

While many of you already know that catching a trout on a fly pattern intended to imitate a mouse or other rodent is perhaps the most exhilarating way to do so, there are always some folks out there that find it hard to believe that trout seek prey as large as mice. The inspiration behind this article, a photo of an unintentionally killed trout that was revealed to have a staggering number of voles in its stomach, likely set those doubts aside for many fishermen out there.

#4) Nymphing: Get More Hookups

I'm always surprised to hear other fly fishermen remark that they very rarely nymph, due to its difficulty or perceived lack of efficacy. If for no other reason, nymphing should be one of every fly fishermen's go-to tactics particularly because it is so deadly effective. It is also simple to learn and become adept at nymphing. If you're struggling with nymphing or just want to up your catch rate, there could be one simple mistake you're making that's costing you hookups.

This is Why you Sling Mice for Trout

In a recent post, oh-so cleverly titled Mousing Accomplished, I related how my pledge to catch a trout on a deer hair mouse pattern while on a brief summer tour of Alaska was saved at nearly the last opportunity by a stroke of good luck. The good news is, my experience was entirely atypical, thanks to a preposterous, never-before-seen Alaskan heat wave. Normally, luring voracious Alaskan rainbows to swung and skated deer hair mouse patterns is relatively easy and fantastically entertaining monkey business.

Rainbow Trout Eats Shrews
I count 19 (photo: Togiak National Wildlife Refuge).

The picture above of the stomach contents of an unintentionally mortally wounded trout caught on the Kanektok River, shared by the staff of the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Alaska, should provide all the proof one would ever need to confidently tie on a mouse pattern when hunting Alaskan rainbow trout. To be fair, the unfortunate souls above are those of the common shrew, and not mice. This is, however, an altogether unimportant distinction. The point is that trout like rodents. A lot.

Mousing Accomplished

I've only recently returned from an almost 3 week stint in Alaska, a trip which turned out quite differently than expected. This was due in part to inaccurate or ignorant assumptions on my behalf, but resulted mostly from a wholly unexpected, never before seen, record-breaking heat wave that set upon Alaska virtually the moment my plane touched ground in state. The result, during large stretches of the trip, was an out-of-the-ordinary sensory experience, a half duffel full of cold weather gear that never saw the light of day and a muted -- albeit still spectacular -- fishing experience.

Alaskan Rainbow Trout eats a mouse pattern.
Trout eats mouse.

One of the unexpected turns of the trip was in regards to my lustful anticipation of spending time in Alaska mousing. Before leaving for the trip, I wrote that I would "finally lay to rest my obsession with catching a big, fat rainbow on a skated mouse pattern", words which I very nearly ended up eating. And, truth be told, it would have most certainly been for lack of trying. Regardless of how long I've been doing this, and regardless of how many unreasonable expectations I've had dashed, I've yet to learn that there are no sure things in the world of fishing. This lesson likely applies to a world far beyond that of fishing, but assuming it does, I've yet to learn that too.

The McCloud River: Enough is Enough

Chances are you've caught a McCloud River rainbow, even though you've likely never fished the McCloud. The McCloud River, in Northern California, was one of the greatest salmon and steelhead rivers in the United States before a series of dams wiped out anadromous fish populations beginning in the 1940s. Part of the Sacramento River watershed, the McCloud is primarily fed by springs at its headwaters southeast of Mount Shasta.

California's McCloud River
The McCloud River, as seen in 'Enough is Enough'.

The McCloud is also home to one of the first rainbow trout hatcheries. Beginning after the establishment of a McCloud River rainbow trout hatchery in 1877, McCloud rainbows were exported all over the world: to the eastern United States, New Zealand, Europe and South America.

Forget Me Knot: Living and Fly Fishing in Bristol Bay

For many of us, the idea of growing up on an Alaska river is the stuff dreams are made of. In Camille Egdorf's case, it is the stuff she is made of. Camille grew up splitting time between Montana and Alaska, spending summers on the shores of the Nushagak River, some 180 miles north of where the Nushagak dumps into Bristol Bay. As one would expect, Camille has grown up to be an accomplished angler, is a well respected name in the industry and pro staff for Allen Fly Fishing.

Bristol Bay Rainbow - Nushagak River
If every river on earth made rainbows like this, the world would be a better place.

In 2012, Camille spent over 100 hours documenting camp life at her parents' -- Dave and Kim Egdorf -- camp on the Nushagak River. The result is a relatively brief but intimate, entertaining and incredibly well crafted look at a season-in-the-life of the Egdorfs and their guests.

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